Adhesives Magazine

New Test Methods Evaluate Effects Of Altitude On Inflatable Packaging

April 17, 2000
A new American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) draft standard presents standardized evaluations of the effects of high altitude on inflatable packages shipped by air.

WEST CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa. — A new American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) draft standard, Test Methods for Determining Air Retention of Inflatable Packaging Systems by Vacuum Method, presents standardized evaluations of the effects of high altitude on inflatable packages shipped by air. Currently proceeding through ASTM balloting, the draft was developed by a task group of Subcommittee D10.23 on Natural Environment Test Methods in Committee D-10 on Packaging.

Users, drivers, packaging manufacturers, engineers and carriers are participating on the task group, which is chaired by Chad Thompson, senior packaging consultant, UPS Professional Services, Hodgkins, Ill.

In his paper, Inflatable Packaging Systems Under High-Altitude Conditions, Thompson writes, “Inflatable packaging systems are finding their way into the mainstream of packaging as more and more companies are looking for efficient, effective and environmentally friendly cushioning and dunnage alternatives. Using positive air pressure, inflatable packaging systems secure products in place while providing an air barrier of protection. One of the potential concerns with inflatable packaging systems is the material’s ability to maintain air pressure under high-altitude conditions. Currently, there is not an industry-recognized or accepted test standard to evaluate the effects of altitude.”

The task group’s goal in developing this test standard is to help ensure the safe transport of products that rely on inflatable packaging as the primary cushion system.

For further information, contact Chad Thompson at 708-387-4562, or e-mail cthompson@UPS.com